150th anniversary celebration planned for North Charleston’s oldest African American neighborhood

Founded by four freedmen in 1871, North Charleston’s oldest African American neighborhood is turning 150 years old. They have a weekend full of activities planned to celebrate the occasion! It kicks of on Friday, September 17 with a dedication to the founders of Liberty Hill: Ishmael Grant, Aaron Middleton, William Lecque and Plenty Lecque. Additionally, there will be opportunities for praise and worship, a salute to military members, book signings, a parade and a fireworks finale. See below for a full list of planned activities.

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

5 PM – Founders Monument Dedication – Felix Pinckney Community Center Garden

5:30 PM – Dedication of Liberty Hill Exhibit at North Charleston Transit Center

7:00 PM – Praise and Worship Program – Felix Pinckney Community Center Park

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

10 AM – Liberty Hill Sesquicentennial Community Parade- Liberty Hill, Montague Avenue

12 PM – Salute to Our Military Members – Felix Pinckney Community Center Garden

12:30 PM – Book signing by Liberty Hill Authors – Felix Pinckney Community Center
(Additionally, Franklin Fetter will be providing COVID Vaccinations from 12 until 3 PM and Habitat for Humanity will be providing information on the Liberty Hill housing rehab program  12 PM Р2 PM)

1 PM – Boxed Lunches – Felix Pinckney Community Center Park

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

10 AM – Residents and Participants will observe the 150th Anniversary at their family churches

1 PM – Placing of floral mementos at St. Peter’s and Grant Cemeteries

8 PM – Fireworks celebration – Felix Pinckney Community Center Park

 

Short History of Liberty Hill:

The land that became Liberty Hill was originally purchased by Paul and Harriet Trescott, Free People of Color. They purchased 112 acres of farmland just north of the City of Charleston in 1864. Seven years later they sold one acre to St. Peters AME Church. It’s still in operation and is the oldest church in North Charleston. They sold the remaining 111 acres to Ishmael Grant, Aaron Middleton, William Lecque and Plenty Lecque who had formerly been enslaved men. Liberty Hill remained largely rural until the ’30s when that began to change. It became a thriving, self-sufficient community with new homes and businesses. It had its own movie theater, a baseball field and boasted the famous Harlem Swing Club. It was also home to a USO for African American servicemen during World War II. The history of Liberty Hill can be explored through a new exhibit at the North Charleston Transit Center and at the International African American Museum (when it opens) thanks to a generous donation from the City of North Charleston.

 

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